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Tuesday, January 31, 2012

Audition Tip of the Month! - Developing Special Skills


      Often times what separates one performer from another is their unique special skills. By developing a healthy mixture of special skills it will bulk up a beginner's resume, and for the seasoned actor it will help to market their unique special abilities. Below are a list of special skills to consider. Every month choose one to explore. If your child feels confident about that skill, then you may add it to your resume. They also must be comfortable doing that activity on FILM. Just because your child is a great swimmer, does not mean they feel comfortable being filmed in their bathing suit, so be sure to ask them if they would be comfortable doing each activity on film.



Bilingual(List)
Fishing
Tennis
Multilingual(List)
Football
Track and Field (events)
International Sign Language
Frisbee
Trampoline
Accents(List)
Golf
Unicycle
Dancing(Style)
Gun Handling
Volleyball
Singing(Style and Range)
Gymnastics
Wrestling
Musical Instruments (List)
Handball
Roller Skating
Juggling
Hang Gliding
Ice Skating
Magic
Street Hockey
Rollerblading
Fire-eating
Horseback Riding
Skateboarding
Animal Trainer
Equestrian
Snowboarding
Aerobics
Rodeo
Snow Skiing
Body Building
Windsurfing
Ski Jumping
Weight Lifting
Water Polo
Snowmobiling
Martial Arts (Discipline & Belt)
Mountain Climbing
Water Skiing
Kickboxing
Rock Climbing
Jet Skiing
Boxing
Repelling
Swimming
Archery
Parachuting
Diving
Badminton
Ping Pong
Synchronized Swimming
Baseball
Racquetball
Scuba (NAUI or PADI)
Basketball
Rugby
Snorkeling
Bicycling
Skeet Shooting
Surfing
Billiards
Trap Shooting
Body Surfing
Bowling
Pantomime
Parasailing
Cricket
Soccer
Boating
Croquet
Softball
Sailing
Fencing
Squash
Canoeing
Kayaking
Drill Team
Motocross
White Water Rafting
Flags
Precision Driving
Baton Twirling
Chorus
Licensed Pilot
Cheerleading
Motorcycling
Stunt Person

     Be specific. If you list a language let them know if you are a beginner, conversational or fluent in that language. Instead of putting "Track and Field" list the specific event you compete in, for instance shot put, or long jump. The more specific you are the better your agent and manager are able to promote you.

     The best tip is to discover your child’s unique potential talent. Everyone is gifted in one thing or another. You need to nurture and develop your child’s natural gift by providing them with training. If your child has good reflexes, perhaps they should be enlisted in a gymnastics class. If your child is graceful, then dance lessons might turn them into a beautiful dancer. If your child is ... energetic, a martial arts course can focus those chaotic moments into centered, deliberate actions. And, if acting is their forte, a good trainer may lead them to success. A good coach will emphasize that good actors do not overact - being too dramatic is a common mistake.

      Training is what separates good talent from bankable talent. You have to remember that there are budgets to consider when booking young talent. The chances of someone with NO training and NO experience booking a lead role is unheard of. Producers will not risk their financial investment on someone without some sort of background in the field.

Friday, January 20, 2012

Ohio Workshop Announcement!

FREE 2-Hour Audition Workshop
Ages 4 and UP (males and females)
ONLY 40 Seats Available!
Saturday, February 4, 10AM-12PM At 
The Embassy Suites -- Dublin, Ohio

To register: email Chad@talent-inc.com. 
Questions, call Chad @ 614-535-8808

Monday, January 16, 2012

Recommended Reading for the beginning actor, All About Method Acting by Ned Manderino


This is a terrific book for any teen reader to begin exploring the many different styles of Method acting. This book is very clear, concise, and outlines many of the exercises used in top training facilities around the world. After reading this book, you will have a better understanding of the craft of acting, and an appreciation for it's history.

Friday, January 13, 2012

Congratulations to Coy Stuart on another 90 episodes of Are We There Yet?

   
  TBS has ordered an additional 90 episodes of the hit sitcom “Are We There Yet?” following this summer’s highly successful 10-episode run. The series, which stars Terry Crews (“Everybody Hates Chris”) and Essence Atkins (“Half and Half”), is produced by Revolution Studios and Cube Vision and distributed by Debmar-Mercury. Revolution’s Joe Roth and Vince Totino and Cube Vision’s Ice Cube and Matt Alvarez serve as executive producers, along with award-winning show-runner Ali LeRoi. In addition to executive producing, Ice Cube plays a recurring guest starring role.

     “’Are We There Yet?’ has proven itself to be an extremely strong addition to TBS’s comedy lineup,” said Michael Wright, executive vice president, head of programming for TBS, TNT and Turner Classic Movies (TCM). “’Are We There Yet?’ attracts a young, diverse audience, making it an especially good fit for our Wednesday night slate of original sitcoms.”

     In “Are We There Yet?”, Crews and Atkins play Nick and Suzanne, a newly married couple whose blended family faces the challenges of everyday life. Teala Dunn and Coy Stewart co-star as Lindsey and Kevin, Nick and Suzanne’s 14 and 10-year-old children. Keesha Sharp (“Why Did I Get Married Too?”) is Suzanne’s best friend, who has a taste for men and the finer things in life. Comedian Christian Finnegan plays Nick’s best friend and owner of a sports memorabilia store. Ice Cube plays a recurring guest starring role as Suzanne’s brother.

     “Are We There Yet?” premiered June 2 as part of TBS’s enormously popular Wednesday lineup of original sitcoms. The series went on to rank among ad-supported cable’s Top 10 new series for the quarter, averaging 2.8 million viewers and 1.5 million adults 18-49. “Are We There Yet?” also scored as the #1 show on television in prime time delivery of African-American adults 18-34 and 18-49 for the second quarter.

West Palm Beach, FL Search Announced!


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Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Congratulations to Brooklyn Decker on her recent role in Battleship!


Please support Brooklyn's recent feature film, Battleship!
Way to go Brooklyn!

Audition Tip of the Month! - Memorization Tips!


How to memorize. The best way to memorize is to approach the script from many different angles, and learning styles. By doing so, it will ensure your script stays in your long term memory.

Try these fun games to memorize:

* Write out your script. If you write out your script on lined paper 3 times, by the third time, you will almost have it down. Make sure you write neatly. Take pride in your work.

* Sing the script to the tune of "Happy Birthday" or any song that comes on the radio. By doing this exercise it will help break you out of vocal patterns which can make the performance predictable.

* Speed Through - Don't worry about voice and diction simply rush through the script as fast as you can. Make sure to say each word, but try to say the entire piece in 3 breaths, then try to get it down to 2, and eventually try to get through the entire piece in ONE breath!

* This last one is for my young performers under the age of 8! Kids love to hear mom and dad perform their scripts. So get a tape recorder, and tape Mommy or Daddy doing their lines, and the young performer can say the lines along with the tape recorder. After a few days, your child will no longer require the tape recorder.